© Dahl Land and Cattle LLP
Superior Cross Of South Devon and Red Angus

About

Dahl Land and Cattle LLP is a 3rd generation family partnership.

The headquarters is located in south central North Dakota at Gackle, which is in Logan county. We purchased the Gackle ranch in 1951 to raise our own feeder cattle in order to fill the feedlot in the Red River Valley of eastern North Dakota.   In 1977 a back-grounding lot came up for sale in the Streeter, ND area, this was about 120 miles closer to the cowherd so the feedlot in eastern ND was sold and the feedlot in Streeter was purchased. The original base cowherd was 120 cows and 150 share cows, which were Hereford and Hereford X Angus. In 1960, 20 registered Hereford heifers were purchased with the thinking that it was better to raise our own bulls to use on the cows to control the genetics of the herd than to purchase them. In 1963 we started selling registered seed stock. In the early 80’s we began studying other breeds to accomplish heterosis and to improve other economic traits. We purchased our first Salers cattle in 1982 because of their calving ease and strong maternal traits. In the late 1980’s we were rebuilding after a drought, we purchased some Red Angus cattle. We purchased the Red Angus to help satisfy our customer’s needs for a breed to cross with their predominantly Simmental cow herds. Red Angus filled that need because of their red color, carcass characteristics, maternal traits, naturally polled heads and the fact that they would work well with our existing herd, helping us to attain our goals for our crossbreeding rotation. All of our breeds are maternal and complimentary to each other.   We have tried in the past and continue to be students of genetics. A report from the Meat Animal Research Center (MARC) in Clay Center, Nebraska caught our attention. The report compared the selection process between and across breeds in order to reduce fat and improve palatability of retail products. The study showed that the South Devon breed excelled in growth and carcass characteristics with an emphasis on tenderness. The breed was also highly maternal. We strive to maintain a high level of heterosis and it appeared that the South Devon breed would fit that quite well so in 1993 we started artificially inseminating to South Devon sires. The following year we purchased both herd sires and cows.   During this same time we were retaining ownership of our steers through the PM Beef Alliance. This source-verified program focused on cattle with less back fat and a larger ribeye area that grade Select or higher. We received carcass data back on the steers and heifers, which in turn influenced our breeding program. Now days, our primary goal is to develop a superior cross between South Devon and Red Angus, that would fit the grid we were working with of combining the marbling of the Red Angus with the pounds, muscling, marbling, and tenderness of the South Devon. We want to be able to maintain these carcass traits and still maintain profitability in the feedlot and retain females in our own herd as well as our customer’s herds.   We have years of carcass data on our feeder cattle along with DNA testing and ultrasound data that prove that our genetic goals are working. Since 1963 we have been proud to offer these genetics to cattle producers to use in their own herds through our annual production sale of bulls and replacement females held the first Tuesday of May.
Jack        Dan        John        Jeff
© Dahl Land and Cattle LLP

About

Dahl Land and Cattle LLP is a 3rd

generation family

partnership.

The headquarters is located in south central North Dakota at Gackle, which is in Logan county. We purchased the Gackle ranch in 1951 to raise our own feeder cattle in order to fill the feedlot in the Red River Valley of eastern North Dakota.   In 1977 a back-grounding lot came up for sale in the Streeter, ND area, this was about 120 miles closer to the cowherd so the feedlot in eastern ND was sold and the feedlot in Streeter was purchased. The original base cowherd was 120 cows and 150 share cows, which were Hereford and Hereford X Angus. In 1960, 20 registered Hereford heifers were purchased with the thinking that it was better to raise our own bulls to use on the cows to control the genetics of the herd than to purchase them. In 1963 we started selling registered seed stock. In the early 80’s we began studying other breeds to accomplish heterosis and to improve other economic traits. We purchased our first Salers cattle in 1982 because of their calving ease and strong maternal traits. In the late 1980’s we were rebuilding after a drought, we purchased some Red Angus cattle. We purchased the Red Angus to help satisfy our customer’s needs for a breed to cross with their predominantly Simmental cow herds. Red Angus filled that need because of their red color, carcass characteristics, maternal traits, naturally polled heads and the fact that they would work well with our existing herd, helping us to attain our goals for our crossbreeding rotation. All of our breeds are maternal and complimentary to each other.   We have tried in the past and continue to be students of genetics. A report from the Meat Animal Research Center (MARC) in Clay Center, Nebraska caught our attention. The report compared the selection process between and across breeds in order to reduce fat and improve palatability of retail products. The study showed that the South Devon breed excelled in growth and carcass characteristics with an emphasis on tenderness. The breed was also highly maternal. We strive to maintain a high level of heterosis and it appeared that the South Devon breed would fit that quite well so in 1993 we started artificially inseminating to South Devon sires. The following year we purchased both herd sires and cows.   During this same time we were retaining ownership of our steers through the PM Beef Alliance. This source-verified program focused on cattle with less back fat and a larger ribeye area that grade Select or higher. We received carcass data back on the steers and heifers, which in turn influenced our breeding program. Now days, our primary goal is to develop a superior cross between South Devon and Red Angus, that would fit the grid we were working with of combining the marbling of the Red Angus with the pounds, muscling, marbling, and tenderness of the South Devon. We want to be able to maintain these carcass traits and still maintain profitability in the feedlot and retain females in our own herd as well as our customer’s herds.   We have years of carcass data on our feeder cattle along with DNA testing and ultrasound data that prove that our genetic goals are working. Since 1963 we have been proud to offer these genetics to cattle producers to use in their own herds through our annual production sale of bulls and replacement females held the first Tuesday of May.
Superior Cross Of South Devon and Red Angus
Jack       Dan     John       Jeff